Precautions to Take After a Kidney Transplant

A kidney transplant is like receiving a second shot at life for several people. There are numerous advantages to receiving kidney transplantation, including having more freedom and more time in the day. There are multiple factors to think about in your life after a kidney transplant. Read our blog to find out more.

Dr.Sumanta Mishra Created on 7th Sep, 21

A kidney transplant is like receiving a second shot at life for several people. There are numerous advantages to receiving kidney transplantation, including having more freedom and more time in the day. There are multiple factors to think about in your life after a kidney transplant. It includes how to care for your current new kidney. Also, visit one of the most leading urologist in Bhubaneswar for getting a kidney transplant.

 

Things to Consider After a Kidney Transplant

 

  • Exercise and a healthy diet

If you were on dialysis before your kidney transplant, you may find a change in what you can drink and eat once you get your new kidney. To avoid high blood pressure, you will require eating low-salt, low-fat foods. Also, if you are a diabetic patient, you will need to keep an eye on that blood sugar. Request that your dietitian assists you in developing an effective diet plan that will benefit your new kidney and you.

 

You may begin a new exercise routine once you have recovered from your transplant surgery. Exercise helps you maintain a healthy heart and lungs, avoid weight gain, and better your mood. Consult your doctor about the types of exercise that are best for you and how often and how much time you should exercise.

 

  • Medicines that suppress the immune system

Kidney transplantation carries the risk of your body rejecting (fighting) the fresh kidney. This rejection can occur if your immune system detects that this kidney you have is not your own. You have to take medicines that make your immune system weak to prevent this from happening. Anti-rejection or Immunosuppressants medications are the names given to these medications.

Take your anti-rejection and other medications exactly as prescribed by your doctor. If you do not take even one dose of your medicine, you may lose your new kidney.

 

Immunosuppressants are essential medications, despite their adverse side effects. They are in charge of keeping your new kidney functional and healthy.

 

  • Depression, anxiety, and mental illness

Transplantation is usually a thrilling experience. Still, it is natural to experience a range of emotions afterward as it is also a significant life change. Please know that you are not alone if you are experiencing anxiety, guilt, or depression. Several transplant patients have such feelings initially for a variety of reasons.

 

  • Mood swings can be a side effect of your immunosuppressive medications.
  • You may be worried or stressed about your new lifestyle.
  • Getting a kidney from a deceased or living donor may make you feel guilty.

Seek support from your friends and family. Also, inform your transplant team about your feelings so that they can provide help. Also, if necessary, they will adjust your medications. A mental health specialist can also be referred to you by your transplant team.

 

Changes in your Lifestyle

 

  • Getting back to your work

If you plan to return to work after your transplant, your transplant specialist may suggest you wait for three to six weeks. You may get limited in what you can perform at the workplace, at least at first (for instance, you should not pick up objects that weigh more than ten pounds).

 

  • Traveling

Thanks to your transplant, you may want to go on a trip now that you feel good and have a lot of energy! Before making a significant trip, your transplant specialist team may advise you to wait for two to three months. Speak with your doctor regarding anything you should think about before going on vacation, such as getting enough immunosuppressant refills to get you through the trip.

 

  • Driving

After your transplant, you should be able to drive within two to four weeks. The reason for the wait is that few medications you will need to take after the transplant can bring vision issues and tremors. It is a good idea to have a person with you when you get back behind the wheel.

 

How to Maintain the Health of your New Kidney?

 

The following are critical to maintaining your health and ensuring that your current kidney functions correctly:

  • Take your immunosuppressants and various other medications exactly as prescribed by your doctor.
  • If you notice any symptoms of infection or chances of kidney rejection, contact your transplant team immediately.
  • Avoid being in the company of sick people.
  • Stay hydrated by drinking a lot of water.
  • Consume low-salt, low-fat, and low-cholesterol foods.
  • Begin an exercise routine, like biking or walking, once your doctor has cleared you.